February 27, 2019

Dampness and Mold Assessment Tool – General Buildings

A new National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) tool will help users assess areas of dampness in buildings and prioritize remediation of problems areas. Users will be guided to assess how moisture causes indoor mold to multiply on building materials and surfaces, and learn how people may be exposed to microbes and their structural components, such as spores and fungal fragments. The resource provides information about the assessment cycle, and detailed instructions on how to use the data collection instrument. (via the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Clearinghouse for Worker Safety and Health)

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From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), NIOSH:

The health of those who live, attend school, or work in damp buildings has been a growing concern through the years due to a broad range of reported building-related symptoms and illnesses. Research has found that people who spend time in damp buildings are more likely to report health problems such as these:

  • Respiratory symptoms (such as in nose, throat, lungs)
  • Development or worsening of asthma
  • Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (a rare lung disease caused by an immune system response to repeated inhalation of sensitizing substances such as bacteria, fungi, organic dusts, and chemicals)
  • Respiratory infections
  • Allergic rhinitis (often called “hay fever”)
  • Bronchitis
  • Eczema

Dampness and Mold Assessment Tool – General Buildings [PDF – 870 KB]

Suggested Citation

NIOSH [2018]. Dampness and Mold Assessment Tool for General Buildings – Form & Instructions. Cox-Ganser J, Martin M, Park JH, Game S. Morgantown WV: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 2019-115, https://doi.org/10.26616/NIOSHPUB2019115External.

Read the original post here.

Posted In: Health and Safety

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